Announcements

 

TAA's 2020
Conference Program
Will Be Announced
December 1

What Attendees Have To Say



TAA Conference Program 

TAA reserves the right to cancel or replace any session as circumstances require. 

Textbook Track    Academic Track     General Track     Roundtables      Robert Christopherson GeoPrimer


Textbook Track


90 Minute Double Session
Theme: Accessibility

Session #1 - Reach All Students: How Can We Make Our Educational Content Accessible to All?

Join a conversation about how textbooks might adapt to the varying needs of today's students. In addition to vision and hearing challenges, students with autism spectrum disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and others, have diagnosed needs that must be met in the learning environment. Beyond that, many students (e.g., older returning learners, single parents with young children, unhoused students, and English language learners) face obstacles that affect learning. Presenters will first briefly address accessibility concerns in textbooks, discussing how we might use our experiences as educators in the online and traditional classroom to find a way forward with textbooks. Then, we'll step aside and engage everyone in a lively open discussion of an increasingly important issue in creating educational materials. Please come ready to share your own tools, practices, ideas, concerns, or questions!

Presenter: Alyssa Harter is an Assistant Professor at Umpqua Community College in the Department of Speech Communication. She also taught at Winona State University and Minnesota State University, Mankato. Her research pursuits include instructional communication, communication pedagogy, curriculum development and instructional design. Her research has been published in i.e. inquiry in education, The Online Journal of New Horizons in Education, and the National Forensics Journal.

Presenter: Laura Jacobi is an Associate Professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato in the Department of Communication Studies.  Previously, Laura taught at the University of Minnesota and the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota.  Her research pursuits include instructional communication, interpersonal communication, and spiritual communication.  She has published articles in a variety of outlets, including the Journal of Intercultural Communication Research, the Journal of Educators Online, i.e. inquiry in educationThe Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, and the Journal of Pedagogic Development.

Presenter: Kevin Patton is an award-winning professor and textbook author in human anatomy and physiology (A&P). He has a podcast and several blogs about teaching and writing, including TheTextbookAuthor.org. A member of the TAA Council of Fellows, Kevin currently serves as TAA Vice President/President-Elect and conference committee chair. Besides teaching undergraduate A&P, he also teaches in a graduate program that trains college instructors of anatomy and physiology. 

Session #2 - Accessibility Update: Opportunities and Challenges

Accessibility has been a hot topic for years, but are students with disabilities finally close to getting equal access to their educational materials as non-disabled students? In California, the Consumer Accessibility Information Label Association (CAILA) is promoting legislation to require publishers to provide accessibility information to students through a standardized label. The non-profit agency Benetech is offering a program called "Global Certified Accessibility" to educational publishers. VitalSource has begun placing an accessibility icon and information on selected product pages. On the international scene, the Marrakesh Treaty has been hailed as the solution to the "book famine" for people with disabilities.

How do these developments affect authors, publishers, and students with disabilities? What opportunities are opening up, and what challenges still need to be addressed? This session will cover these topics and more to bring you the latest on accessibility from an accessibility industry veteran.

Presenter: Robert Martinengo has over twenty years experience making textbooks accessible to students with disabilities. He believes text and academic authors have an important role in accessibility and has presented at several TAA conferences. He is now working on accessibility label legislation in California.


60 Minute Sessions

5 Things Your Royalty Statements Don't Tell You

The goal of this session is to help authors understand what information is provided by their publishers and help identify gaps in that information. This discussion will help authors be better informed so they know how to ask publishers more informed questions about adoptions, sales and royalties. The presenter will encourage Q&A and discussion.

Presenter: Juli Saitz, CPA, is a Senior Managing Director at Ankura Consulting Group. She leads the contract and royalty compliance practice at Ankura and has extensive experience serving clients including several textbook authors as well as multi-national corporation licensors. Her work in this area includes developing and implementing royalty compliance programs and performing audits of licensees around the world. Juli has helped authors and corporate clients recover millions of dollars in asserting their audit rights related to licensed copyrights, trademarks and patents. She is focused on the shift in the publishing industry to electronic content delivery methods and adaptive learning platforms. In addition, Juli has served as a damages expert in matters involving royalty disputes in the publishing industry.


Copyright and Permissions Issues for the 21st Century Textbook Author

Many authors have piecemeal information about copyright law, and how it relates to both their own books and permissions issues for other people's content, but less of a sense of how it all fits together. Especially as more authors are self-publishing or publishing through OER, you can't always count on a publisher to steer you through the permissions process. Additionally, where many authors wear additional "instructor" hats, it is important to understand when and how you can use material in the classroom (both in person and virtual).  

Presenter: Brenda Ulrich is an intellectual property attorney who focuses on publishing, higher education, copyright and trademark law. Brenda represents authors negotiating and interpreting publishing agreements, agency agreements, and joint author agreements. She also advises colleges and universities on the development and implementation of intellectual property policies, navigating copyright questions related to teaching and scholarship, as well as managing and defending college and university trademark portfolios. She is a partner in the law firm of Archstone Law Group PC.


Creating an Author Branding Platform: What, Why, and How To

All textbook, book, and monograph authors need a platform to help sell their idea to a publisher and their work to buyers and readers. Gone are the days that an author can ignore marketing. Publishing Consultant John Bond will explain what an Author Platform is and why you need one. He will discuss the importance of starting early and not waiting until after the book is written. Topics will include speaking engagements, social media, networking with your current contacts, working with your institution and professional association, and many more. Bring your ideas, questions, and an open mind.

Presenter: John Bond has over 25 years pf experience in scholarly publishing, most recently as Chief Content Officer. He is now a Publishing Consultant at RiverwindsConsulting.com and advises author and publisher on creating and delivering great content. He is the author of 4 books and as a publisher has overseen the publishing of 20,000 journal articles and 500 scholarly books.


Digital Is Coming for Your Textbooks

While it's long been prophesied that the print textbook would disappear, it's actually taken quite a bit longer than people anticipated. This presentation will review the latest developments in the creation, sourcing, and delivery of digital textbooks. In addition, it will examine the looming fight for control of usage data. Administrators, instructors, and students increasingly demand all-inclusive and unlimited access to online educational materials (think, Netflix for textbooks). In July 2019, Pearson announced it would end the longstanding practice among textbook publishers of revising all active titles every three years according to a printing schedule. Instead, the British-based education publisher will employ a digital-first discipline for its publishing program. As textbooks give way to courseware, textbook authors will be looking for an education in 21st century business models.

Presenter: Christopher Kenneally hosts CCC's podcast series Beyond the Book, which debuted in 2006 and has posted over 1.5 million downloads. As CCC's Director, Relationship Marketing, he is responsible for organizing and hosting programs that address the business needs of all stakeholders in publishing and research. His reporting has appeared in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, The Independent (London), WBUR-FM, NPR, and WGBH-TV.


Let's Make a Deal

In this interactive session, participants will be invited to negotiate specific provisions in a typical textbook contract with presenter, Steve Gillen, an attorney with 40 years of experience negotiating book publishing contracts. Steve will provide a menu of common provisions and participants can pick which of them they'd like to tackle. Learn what works, what doesn't, and why. Learn what questions to ask. (Get a leg up in advance by reading a copy of Steve's book - Guide to Textbook Publishing Contracts).

Presenter: Steve Gillen is a partner at Wood Herron & Evans LLP in Cincinnati, OH, where he counsels clients in publishing, copyrights, and related matters. He is a TAA Council Member and a long-time presenter at its annual conferences. He has written and spoken nationally on various publishing and copyright topics and teaches courses in Media Law at the University of Cincinnati. Earlier in his career, Steve served as in-house counsel for a middle-market educational publishing company.


Textbook Revision: One Author's Modus Operandi

What's involved in revising an established college textbook every three years? Is it just old wine in a new bottle, as many non-authors suspect? How daunting is it to aspiring authors not just to write a first edition, but to keep it fresh and up to date, revising every three years or so? Ken will describe his process in all stages including keeping up with the literature and planning a new edition, assimilating peer reviews and user suggestions, writing, length control, drafting art and guiding the illustrators, finding photos, designing new cover art, relations with the editorial and production team, proofreading, marketing, adapting to the digital market, and customer appreciation.

Presenter: Ken Saladin writes three college textbooks with McGraw-Hill Education, totaling 17 editions and 2,700 pages, each revised every three years. He is solo author of Anatomy & Physiology: The Unity of Form and Function (recipient of a 2017 McGuffey Textbook Longevity Award) and Human Anatomy, each published in four languages. His third book, Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology, is coauthored with Robin McFarland for students requiring a sub-baccalaureate introduction to the subject.


The 2020 Textbook Report: The Empire Strikes Back

The educational publishing industry has been besieged by an armada of disruptors including used books, OER, piracy, lawsuits, unfavorable news, and bankruptcies. But publishers are gathering forces to strike back. What are their battle strategies, and how will these strategies affect authors? Join June Jamrich Parsons in this session for an update on the status of the educational publishing industry. This overview of key industry events, publisher finances, and publishing trends is designed to help authors "feel the force" of their industry in order to navigate, negotiate, and nurture their writing careers.

Presenter: June Jamrich Parsons is an author, educator, digital book pioneer, and co-author of the TAA McGuffey Award-winning textbook New Perspectives on Computer Concepts, is a member of the TAA Council of Fellows, and chair of the TAA Publishing Practices Committee. She co-developed the first commercially successful multimedia, interactive digital textbook; one that set the bar for platforms now being developed by educational publishers. Her career includes extensive classroom teaching, product design for eCourseware, textbook authoring for Course Technology and Cengage, scripting for Python programming videos, and content management for virtual reality STEM modules.


What is Happening to Your Textbook?

This session seeks to bring together published textbook authors to discuss shifting author roles related to the current trends in publishing. Is your book continuing to be published on the so-called traditional three-year cycle? Are you being asked to work on digital content to accompany your textbook? If so, are you being paid for hire, or is this part of your current contract? Have your royalties changed? By sharing among authors, we may identify some publishing trends (or not) and establish what might be a reasonable work request from our publisher as they shift to more digital offerings. Come with answers and questions. Stronger together. All are welcome.

Presenter: Laura Frost is professor of chemistry and Interim Associate Dean at Florida Gulf Coast University. She is co-author of an introductory chemistry textbook in fourth edition. She has a strong background in K-20 STEM Education and gives many invited talks on subjects surrounding STEM pedagogy including applying the science of learning to effective classroom instruction, using active learning in the classroom, and implementing classroom assessment techniques. Dr. Frost will moderate the discussion.


Academic Track


90 Minute Double Session
Theme: Productivity Tools for Academics

Session #1 - Streamline Your Data Management & Writing Productivity: Digital Citation Management System Tools

Making sure you include the breadth and depth of the work of others in your journal article submissions can be time consuming and frustrating. Many writers struggle with managing the large amount of resources involved in their projects. How do you manage all those resources? Do you have stacks of articles in your office? A file cabinet full of articles? Multiple electronic files of articles yet to be reviewed? In this session, two experienced academic writers will share two free, open-source tools (Zotero, Mendeley) for organizing collections of citations, journal articles, and papers and for effectively including the work of others in your manuscript. Participants will learn how to use these “personal assistant” productivity tools to collect, organize, cite, annotate, and share literature in one convenient place, accessible across platforms.

Presenter: Julie Peterson Combs is Professor of Educational Leadership at Sam Houston State University located north of Houston, TX. She serves as the director of the doctoral program in educational leadership. In addition to maintaining an active research agenda, she has written over 84 journal articles, seven book chapters, and co-authored four books including The Trust Factor: Strategies for School Leaders (Routledge).

 

Presenter: Dannelle D. Stevens is a professor emerita, faculty in residence for academic writing at Portland State University. She has authored numerous journal articles. Based on research and working with national and international faculty on the complex tasks associated with balancing teaching, writing and publishing, she published her fifth book in 2018, Write more, publish more, stress less! Five key principles for a creative and sustainable scholarly practice. She conducts workshops and coaching to faculty and universities on writing and career-related choices that lead to a successful career in academe.

Session #2 - Manuscript Matchmaking: Free Tools for Placing Your Paper

Whether you're looking to publish in a traditional journal or exploring open access options, finding the right home for your manuscript can be a daunting process. In this hands-on session, attendees will be introduced to two free tools for locating appropriate journals for their work: Scimago Journal & Country Rank and CiteScore. Using these resources, attendees will locate metrics for journals respected in their fields and utilize these metrics as a point of comparison for other publications. The presenters will also briefly touch on helpful subscription tools that may be available through attendees' academic libraries. Attendees are strongly encouraged to bring a laptop or tablet to this session.

Presenter: Danielle S. Apfelbaum is a Senior Assistant Librarian at Farmingdale State College, where she serves as the Scholarly Communication Librarian. Her primary responsibilities include but are not limited to assisting faculty and staff with navigating copyright, fair use, open licensing, and open access publishing. She received her Creative Commons Certification in October 2018.

 

Presenter: Kathryn Machin is the Periodical/Electronic Resources Librarian at Farmingdale State College where she currently manages the print and electronic journal collections as well as the databases for Greenley Library. Prior to working a Farmingdale State College, Kathryn worked as an Electronic Resource Management Technician at the Stony Brook University Libraries for 11 years.


60 Minute Sessions

A Crash Course on Open Access

Although open access publishing has been around for years, misconceptions about what "open" is and what it means for authors' works continue to persist. This session aims to demystify this multifaceted concept. By the end of this session, attendees will be able to describe and distinguish between common varieties of open access (green, gold, and platinum), understand how specific varieties of open access impact the dissemination of their work, and conceptualize the relationships between open access and peer review, copyright, and open licensing.

Presenter: Danielle S. Apfelbaum is a Senior Assistant Librarian at Farmingdale State College, where she serves as the Scholarly Communication Librarian. Her primary responsibilities include but are not limited to assisting faculty and staff with navigating copyright, fair use, open licensing, and open access publishing. She received her Creative Commons Certification in October 2018.


Concretizing the Abstract: The Power of Shorth and the Value of Length

And that's why your books have such power and strength. You publish with shorth! (Shorth is better than length.) -- Dr. Seuss.  In the genre of academic writing, only abstracts heed the good doctor's advice. Realistically, to extract key findings, busy researchers may read only the abstract, therefore it must highlight your essential points. For those readers proceeding onward, the abstract provides an advance organizer that frames their interpretation of your work. So how do we construct abstracts that both inform and invite onward? In this interactive session, via comparing and contrasting abstracts across disciplines, we will determine a) essential, b) recommended, and c) non-recommended features of abstracts. Next, through the lens of rhetorical moves, we will consider the underlying structure. Finally, tools, including templates and concrete steps, will be provided for efficiency of future abstract writing.

Presenter: After being a tenured professor at Texas A&M University, Erin McTigue started her own business, The Positive Academic, through which she mentors and coaches academics in writing and productivity, as well as runs workshops. While at Texas A&M, she co-directed a university-wide writing support program and developed an academic writing course for international students. Erin is widely published, has won teaching and mentoring awards, and continually aims to bring a lightness of spirit to the weight of academia.

Presenter: Sharon Matthews is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Literacy in the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Culture at Texas A&M University. Sharon utilizes her public classroom teaching experiences, supported by ongoing supervision, research, and translation of evidence-based practices to guide the preparation of knowledgeable, decisive, and agentive preservice teachers who integrate literacy across all contexts. Her research interests include writing development, disciplinary literacy, and the selection and integration of diverse children’s literature.


Pitfalls to Avoid: Unload the Dead Weight in Your Academic Writing

In this hands-on session, you will explore ways to eliminate dead weight in your own academic writing.  First, you will engage in activities to identify common pitfalls -- passive voice, nominalizations, and dead wood in selections of academic writing.  Then, in small groups, you will exchange ideas, practice eliminating the dead weight, and revive the writing selection. Finally, after sharing our collective knowledge, we anticipate feeling empowered and inspired to apply these ideas to enliven our own academic writing. 

Presenter: Micki M. Caskey is professor at Portland State University whose areas of specialization include doctoral student writing and middle grades research. Micki is co-series editor of The Handbook of Research in Middle Level Education and The Handbook of Resources in Middle Level Education. She is also former editor of Research in Middle Level Education Online, an international peer-reviewed research journal. Micki is author or editor of more than 75 publications and 125 conference presentations.


Strengthen Your Qualitative Research and Writing: Approach, Validity, and Saturation

Qualitative research allows authors to go beyond merely counting how often or to how many something occurs. Rather, it provides insights into how or why certain actions are taken or the ways in which people interpret their experiences. Yet, many researchers are hesitant to journey into qualitative research beyond a few open-ended survey questions, due to concerns about qualitative research lacking the rigor and validity of quantitative studies. In this workshop, taught by a Journal Editor who critiques a multitude of qualitative submissions each year, you will learn how to set a solid foundation for your qualitative work, why focus group should not be listed as your qualitative approach, the different meanings of saturation and how to know if you've reached it, and techniques for checking the validity of your work. Participants will leave the session knowing how to avoid the common pitfalls that lead to manuscript rejection.

Presenter: Julie Reeder has been an Associate Editor for the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior for six years, where she makes decisions on more than 150 submitted manuscripts each year. In her role as Senior Research Analyst with the State of Oregon WIC Program she has conducted numerous interviews and focus groups over the past two decades. She appreciates the richness that qualitative research brings to her work in building systems level solutions to addressing health and educational disparities for families with young children.


Support Strategies for Your Writing Journey

Emotions can propel our writing projects forward with inspiration, or stop us in our tracks. In fact, when as writers we procrastinate, avoid feedback, drop unfinished (but promising) projects, or hold onto finished work for too long, negative emotions often reinforce these decisions. Therefore, recognizing and promoting emotional support is key for successful writing. Academic writing, whether as an independent author or faculty member, is often a lonely business offering few built-in supports. In this interactive panel, based on lived experiences and research, we discuss practices in creating and sustaining writing communities to support the emotional aspect of writing, via traditional writing groups and in alternative formats. We consider ways to engage authors in conversations to better understand the emotional aspects of writing. Finally, transitioning from the group to the individual, we also discuss independent strategies, such as expressive writing, which can help manage negative emotions and nurture positive ones.

Presenter: Kristen Cvancara is a Professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato in the Department of Communication Studies. She investigates interpersonal communication and social influence patterns involving the use of verbal aggression. Her research is published in the Journal of Family Communication, Personal Relationships, Communication Quarterly, Communication Teacher, North American Journal of Psychology, Social Psychology of Education and has authored book chapters in the edited books Anti- and Pro-Social Communication and Bullying Among University Students.

Presenter: After being a tenured professor at Texas A&M University, Erin McTigue started her own business, The Positive Academic, through which she mentors and coaches academics in writing and productivity, as well as runs workshops. While at Texas A&M, she co-directed a university-wide writing support program and developed an academic writing course for international students. Erin is widely published, has won teaching and mentoring awards, and continually aims to bring a lightness of spirit to the weight of academia. 


The Name Game: Crafting Compelling Titles for Your Academic Books and Articles

The title of your book or article may be the only part of your writing that most scholars will ever read. They will often use it alone to decide whether to read your work, cite your work, or even hire you, so it must be carefully crafted to entice. In this workshop, you will learn how to write compelling titles from the title-whisperer Wendy Laura Belcher, the award-winning author of the best-selling book Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks. Bring your titles to be workshopped.

Presenter: Wendy Laura Belcher is professor of African literature in Princeton University's departments of Comparative Literature and African American Studies. She worked as a freelance copyeditor for many years, then served for eleven years as the managing editor of a peer-reviewed journal in ethnic studies at UCLA, and has personally taught hundreds of graduate students and faculty about writing for publication. Her best-seller Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks: A Guide to Academic Publishing Success (University of Chicago Press 2019) has helped thousands to publish their important work.


Where Do You Get Stuck?  Clean Up Your Writing Clutter

Plan to invest in yourself and your writing productivity by learning ways to acknowledge and account for all the writing you have, regardless of the stage it's in. You'll learn to declutter your writing projects, thereby letting you know what you have, where to find it, and how to move it forward. Only then is your writing of use to you and those who benefit from what you write. You will walk away with actual folders where you've delineated your big and small writing projects. Going forward, instead of being derailed and frustrated by your writing clutter (physical, mental, emotional, or spiritual) you'll be able to focus on getting your writing done. Be prepared to laugh and learn (and be surprised!) in this session especially designed to help reduce your stress and increase your peaceful productivity around writing. 

Presenter: Meggin McIntosh, Professor Emerita (University of Nevada, Reno), now known as The PhD of Productivity, is an author, coach, and workshop leader. She works with overwhelmed academics who would prefer to be overjoyed, instead. Meggin has been called "an educational treasure" and has won every teaching award for which she was eligible at the University (locally, state-wide, and regionally). Her mission is inspiring joyful work.


Writing Productivity Shouldn't Be a Surprise: Think Through Your Summer Plan with Wisdom, Intention, and Truthfulness

How many summers have you had plans big plans for getting SO MUCH WRITING DONE? Probably since you were in graduate school. How many Septembers have arrived with you completing less than you hoped? Probably the same number. If you are tired of a cycle that ultimately ends in disappointment and self-recrimination, then this session is for you! Learn how to think through your summer -- all aspects of it -- so you can plot out your potential for prodigiousness with a plan that actually works. You'll receive a template that you can use for this summer, as well as other seasons when academics need a wise, intentional, and truthful plan for their writing (December holidays, sabbatical, research leave, etc.).

If you want to keep your "wits" about you this summer, i.e., your wisdom, intention, and truthfulness, attend this session to learn how to plan thoughtfully and with integrity.

Presenter: Meggin McIntosh, Professor Emerita (University of Nevada, Reno), now known as The PhD of Productivity, is an author, coach, and workshop leader. She works with overwhelmed academics who would prefer to be overjoyed, instead. Meggin has been called "an educational treasure" and has won every teaching award for which she was eligible at the University (locally, state-wide, and regionally). Her mission is inspiring joyful work.


General Track


90 Minute Double Session
Theme - Alternative Publishing Options: Online Course Materials, Supplements, and Working with Small Publishers

Session #1 - Stretching the Boundaries of Textbook Authoring: Writing for Online Courses

As digital instruction and instructional content proliferate, veteran textbook authors have increasing opportunities to author in other media. In this session Sasha will share his experiences pitching, writing, and creating online training materials and review some of the similarities with traditional textbook authoring -- including the writing process and royalty arrangements -- and a few differences. Sasha will also explore the current terrain of online training, identifying the main companies and content delivery modes. By stretching the boundaries of textbook writing, you may find opportunities worth pursuing!

Presenter: Sasha Vodnik is an author of several textbooks in the area of computer programming and applications, the first of which was published in 1999. As an author with LinkedIn Learning (formerly Lynda.com), Sasha currently writes and records instructional video courses that are published in an online library. Sasha also teaches in-person courses at General Assembly San Francisco.

Session #2 - Think Small! How Authoring Stand-alone Supplements with Small Publishers Could Be Your Niche

The overall goal of this session is to explore an attractive alternative to textbook authoring: writing stand-alone supplements and working with a small publisher. Paul will share how he was able to launch his author/illustrator career with Morton Publishing's best-selling four-book series called The Visual Analogy Guides. (These books cover the fields of human anatomy, physiology, and chemistry.) The benefits of both working with a small publisher and working on stand-alone supplements will be explained. Is this niche market for you? Come and find out!

Presenter: Paul A. Krieger is a Professor Emeritus of Anatomy and Physiology at Grand Rapids Community College and currently works as author and illustrator for Morton Publishing's Visual Analogy Guide series. He also works as a scientific illustrator.

 


60 Minute Sessions

Brand Beyond Borders: Making Your Name

How can you convey your unique expertise to new readers outside your home discipline? How can you build credibility with professionals, practitioners, policymakers or community members outside of academia? For some, institutional affiliations reinforce a positive reputation, but for others it is limiting. Freelance, independent, or non-academic writers have to make their own marks. Part self-reflection, part marketing, we'll think about how to develop and communicate our brands. I'll share thinking behind my brand, "free-range scholar," and show other successful examples. By reaching beyond your home discipline, you are able to find new audiences for your work, and potentially new partners. At the same time, you have the chance to incorporate new perspectives or applications of your ideas into your writing.

Presenter: Janet Salmons is a free-range scholar, writer, coach, and artist through Vision2Lead. Areas of interest include emerging research methods, and teaching and learning in the digital age. Janet has written 10 books, with more on the way. Janet is the Methods Guru and lead writer for SAGE Methodspace. She is an honorary member of the TAA Council of Fellows (2019) and received the Mike Keedy Award (2018) in recognition of enduring service to authors.


How to Use Mind Mapping to Make Yourself a More Productive Writer

Someone once asked William Faulkner if he wrote by inspiration or by habit. His reply? He wrote by inspiration, but, luckily it arrived at 9 am every morning. For writers who don't have inspiration show up at their door so regularly, mind mapping is a simple technique that can help. Developed by a noted thinker of the 3rd century, mind mapping is a visually graphic way of thinking and planning. It's fun, easy-to-do and best of all, it can banish writer's block and make writing enjoyable again. The technique is particularly useful for academic writers who frequently become trapped by linear and logical ways of thinking. Mind mapping, in contrast, encourages creativity, out-of-the-box ideas and inspiration.

Presenter: Daphne Gray-Grant teaches academics, book writers and business owners how to banish writer's block so they can write with happiness and ease. A former senior editor at a major metropolitan daily newspaper, Daphne became an independent writing and editing coach in 1985. She is author of 8 1/2 Steps to Writing Faster, Better and, Your Happy First Draft. She has been blogging since 2006 and hosting a YouTube channel since 2017.


Publishing Metrics: Understanding the Basics and Using Them to Your Advantage

Metrics has become a trendy word that is often glazed over or misunderstood. Journal and Book Publishing is no exception. Impact Factor, Altmetrics, h-index, Eigenfactor score, article views/downloads, copies sold, citations, and others need not be a foreign language. Publishing Consultant John Bond gives a simple, approachable explanation of the common basic metrics and then moves onto how to use them to your advantage. Mastering these metrics in a simple, defined way can help you target the best journal to submit your work to. They can help you create a more attractive book proposal and find the best publisher for your new textbook idea. You'll receive a descriptive handout with examples so you can choose a couple and use these powerful tools to help with your publishing goals.

Presenter: John Bond has over 25 years of experience in scholarly publishing, most recently as Chief Content Officer. He is now a Publishing Consultant at RiverwindsConsulting.com and advises authors and publishers on creating and delivering great content. He is the author of 4 books and as a publisher has overseen the publishing of 20,000 journal articles and 500 scholarly books.


 Why Textbook & Academic Authors Should Be Podcasting. Right Now.

It's the dawning of the age of podcasting. Sure, streaming and downloadable audio programs available from an internet feed have been around for a while. But all signs show that podcasts are poised to explode in the number and variety of people reached. Starting today. Actually, last week. But today will work, too. Why now? The earlier we start, the better we can establish our show before the big rush, work out the kinks, and build a following. And the sooner we'll be a welcome voice in the ears of colleagues in our field and potential consumers of our academic works as they commute, walk their pets, or lounge on the patio after a hard day of teaching. Join Kevin as he relates his podcasting experience, outlines many different benefits of podcasting, and gives you loads of practical tips for starting and running your own podcast. Right now.

Presenter: Kevin Patton is an award-winning professor and textbook author in human anatomy and physiology (A&P). He has a podcast and several blogs about teaching and writing, including TheTextbookAuthor.org. A member of the TAA Council of Fellows, Kevin currently serves as TAA Vice President/President-Elect and conference committee chair. Besides teaching undergraduate A&P, he also teaches in a graduate program that trains college instructors on anatomy and physiology.


Roundtables


'Herding Cats': The Ins and Outs of Creating an Academic (but still interesting) Edited Collection

Are you considering putting together an edited book? We will show you some paths to creating an academic collection: from the initial idea to submitting a proposal through to getting the finished product in before the deadline. The editor will discuss how she managed a previous edited collection and share how she's working through her current project. She will be joined by respected colleagues working in the same topic area who will also share what they've learned from their previous writing projects -- ideas that will help you! The roundtable will focus on answering your questions about sticky issues such as: What if my collection varies from the standard academic model? How can I market a "risky" book? How can I keep the whole thing afloat and on deadline, while still retaining the goodwill of my colleagues? And why on earth would I want to (i.e. what's in it for me)?

Presenter: Davinia Thornley lectures at the University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand. She has published articles and book chapters on indigenous issues, nationality, and New Zealand cinema. In 2014 she wrote the academic manifesto, "Cinema, Cross-Cultural Collaboration, and Criticism" and in 2017 she led the international Screenwriting Research Network conference. Her edited collection, "True Event Adaptation: Scripting Real Lives," grew out of this event. Her current research centers on academic and activist representations of child-free people.

Presenter: Laura Carroll is a nonfiction author and internationally recognized expert on the childfree choice. Her books include: Voluntary and Involuntary Childlessness: The Joys of Otherhood? (contributor), a resource for scholars, students and policymakers; Families of Two: Interviews with Happily Married Couples without Children by Choice, which received global recognition; The Baby Matrix: Why Freeing Our Minds from Outmoded Thinking about Parenthood & Reproduction Will Create a Better World, which has been used in college curriculum.

Presenter: Laura S. Scott is the author of Two is Enough: A Couple's Guide to Living Childless by Choice and Director of The Childless by Choice Project. Scott regularly speaks as a subject matter expert and conference speaker on the global trend of Voluntary Childlessness, and has made appearances on the NBC Today Show, CNN, Al Jazeera, and on CBC, BBC, and NPR radio shows.


To-do Lists for Every Round of Textbook Production

Whether you are a new textbook author or a seasoned pro, you may struggle to take a systematic approach to the many tasks involved in chapter revision and book production. A disorganized author may forget important tasks, possibly leading to errors. During this roundtable, Marielle plans to share her detailed to-do lists for first drafts, copyedited chapters, first pass pages, revised pages, and confirming pages. Participants can edit her checklists for use in their production work and share their own tips and tricks for staying on top of every task.

Presenter: Marille Hoefnagels is a professor at the University of Oklahoma, with a joint appointment in the Department of Biology and the Department of Microbiology/Plant Biology.  She has been a textbook author for about 20 years and currently has two general biology textbooks, both published by McGraw-Hill. Her primary responsibility at OU is to teach nonmajors biology, but she regularly teaches courses in mycology and scientific writing as well.


Understanding Royalty Statements is NOT an Introductory Course

In this roundtable, Rich Wessler will lead an interactive discussion focused on understanding the ins and outs of royalty statements. Attendees will be encouraged to ask questions regarding how to interpret their royalty statements and what specific elements mean. Topics to be covered include spotting trends from one royalty statement to another, spotting red flags on your royalty statement, and how to translate a publisher’s comments about how they will sell your content to how it will appear on your royalty statement.

Presenter: Richard Wessler is a Senior Director at Ankura Consulting Group, affiliated with the New York, NY office. He has more than 20 years of experience in the Higher Education publishing market in matters related to author royalty calculations, intellectual property compliance and Accounting/Finance analysis and reporting.


What does mindfulness have to do with academic writing? Lots!

Can practicing mindfulness benefit your academic writing as well as your personal life? The answer is a resounding yes! Mindfulness is the holistic practice of beginning or stopping what you are doing with intention and checking in with what you are feeling and thinking, here and now. Understanding more about yourself through reflection and mindfulness can enable you to develop your writing as a holistic practice and provide the creativity, focus, and momentum you need to sustain your efforts over the long haul. Practicing mindfulness is instrumental in the creative aspects of academic writing, such as discovering the essential questions to research or writing the title of the manuscript, and it can be key to maximizing the focus you need while crafting your manuscript. This session is designed to offer a set of mindfulness exercises to tap the richness of your experience and weave it into your academic writing life.

Presenter: Dannelle D. Stevens is a professor emerita, faculty in residence for academic writing at Portland State University. She has authored numerous journal articles. Based on research and working with national and international faculty on the complex tasks associated with balancing teaching, writing and publishing, she published her fifth book this year, Write more, publish more, stress less! Five key principles for a creative and sustainable scholarly practice. She conducts workshops and coaching to faculty and universities on writing and career-related choices that lead to a successful career in academe.


 

Writing a dissertation and beyond: Tips & Tools for Launching and Maintaining Your Academic Writing Productivity

Writing productivity is important for academics at all levels. For graduate students, in particular, writing is essential for completing a dissertation. Unfortunately, approximately 50% of doctoral students do not complete their degrees, often dropping out during the dissertation writing stage. How can graduate students launch a healthy writing habit in order to complete their dissertations and maintain academic writing productivity as faculty? In this presentation, we will discuss research-based, practical tools and tips that have helped us successfully complete dissertations and launch productive academic careers. We will also discuss the versatility of transforming and personalizing these tools to help manage other aspects of academic life and work. Participants will have an opportunity to explore and modify the tools provided based on their personalized academic needs.

Presenter: Danielle Feeney is a Lecturer in Special Education in the Patton College of Education at Ohio University. Her research interests include academic and behavioral interventions for students with learning disabilities and emotional/behavioral disorders; cognitive behavioral modification; and school-based mental health supports. As a recent graduate student and new faculty member, she is interested in helping graduate students and faculty be productive academic writers.

Presenter: Margarita Huerta is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Early Childhood, Multilingual, and Special Education in the College of Education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her research interests include integrating literacy in science for English Learners; pre and in-service teacher education; and writing instruction for students at all levels and ages, including factors affecting graduate students' and faculty’s academic writing productivity.


GeoPrimer


GeoPrimer: Where the Golden State Began

TAA is in San Diego, where the Golden State began. A diverse past from Native Americans attuned to the mild climate and hospitable conditions, to European discovery in 1542 and later settlement in 1769, on through a Mexican period, center of Alta California; an area eventually becoming part of the United States. All these elements flowed northward throughout California, which entered the Union in 1850. The landscape and climate are just as diverse. Active tectonic forces embrace San Diego alongside the San Andreas system and the Peninsular mountain ranges. A natural bay forms the port and harbor to the west, and the Pacific Ocean. The climate offers a variety of temperature and moisture settings across the region, from dry-hot desert interior, to the milder coastal conditions. Our GeoPrimer covers all this and the 8th-largest city in the U.S. and 2nd-largest in California.

Presenter: Robert Christopherson was Professor of Geography at American River College for three decades, receiving many teaching awards. He earned B.A., California State University, Chico, and M.A., Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. In 2012, CSUC awarded him their Distinguished Alumni Award. He is author of leading texts, Geosystems, 10/e, Elemental Geosystems, 9/e, among others, published by Pearson. Robert and his wife, Bobbe', a published nature photographer in her own right, direct travels to text research, completing 17 expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic, tropical Pacific, and elsewhere.


If you would like to review program content from TAA's past conferences, please click on the images below.

 

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