Announcements

The conference schedule will be posted in December.

What Attendees Have To Say

 


TAA Conference Program 

The following sessions are presented by track and in alphabetical order by title.TAA reserves the right to cancel or replace any session as circumstances require. 

Academic Track    Textbook Track     General Track     Roundtables      Robert Christopherson GeoPrimer


Academic Track


Keynote Presentation: The Critical Importance of Scholarly Discipline‚Äč

Kent Anderson, CEO of Redlink, will discuss how scholarly practices are of critical importance as we face an information economy that has become increasingly overwhelmed with self-interested distortions of fact presented on an equal footing with facts and research findings. As the current environment evolves, scholars who seek to express and share findings based in observable reality are increasingly challenged or, worse, dismissed. Kent will argue the need for new approaches, governance, and practices by researchers, educators, and publishers in order to preserve quality information, the relevance of science, and the ascendancy of objective reality.

Keynote Presenter: Kent R. Anderson is the CEO of RedLink, a past-President of the Society for Scholarly Publishing, and the founder of "The Scholarly Kitchen". He has been Publisher for Science, CEO of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery; Publishing Director for the New England Journal of Medicine; and Director of Medical Journals at the American Academy of Pediatrics. He is an award-winning writer, editor, and designer. He has a BA in English and an MBA.


A New Publishing Landscape: The Curiosities, Opportunities, & Pitfalls of Open Access Publishing

Open access (OA) publishing is a unique model for disseminating academic work to a larger readership that is not controlled by traditional publishing/subscription gate-keepers. This panel provides an informative session reviewing OA as a new publishing landscape ripe with opportunities and potential pitfalls. To help you navigate this uncharted terrain, three presenters will guide you through a discussion covering OA's origin story, models under which OA operates, pros and cons of the OA landscape, and differing perspectives on OA from a variety of academic stakeholders. The goal of the session is to educate participants about OA publishing and generate an open dialogue of the virtues and vices it offers academics. By the end of the session you will walk away with a mental map equipped to chart your own path into (or away from) OA territory.

Presenter: Kristen Cvancara is an Associate Professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato in the Department of Communication Studies.  Her research investigates interpersonal communication and social influence. She studies the use of verbal aggression among romantics, siblings, peers at school, and in parent-child relationships. She has published research in the Journal of Family Communication, Personal Relationships, Communication Quarterly, Communication Teacher, is a Fulbright recipient (Finland, 2012), and enjoys presenting at regional, national, and international conferences.

Presenter: Laura Jacobi is an Assistant Professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato in the Department of Communication Studies.  Previously, Laura taught at the University of Minnesota and the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her research pursuits include instructional communication and spiritual communication. Recently, she has published a book chapter on forensics pedagogy and several scholarly journal articles in the Qualitative Report, Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, and i.e. inquiry in education.

Presenter: Heidi Southworth (MLIS, MA) is an Assistant Professor and Digital Initiatives Librarian at Minnesota State University, Mankato. She manages Cornerstone, the University’s open access, institutional repository and provides leadership and direction for its development and growth. Heidi also contributes to the growth and development of ARCH, the open access, digital collection platform for the University Archives. She has given presentations on digital collections, digital preservation and institutional repositories at various national and regional conferences.


A Personal Writing Team for Productivity and Accountability

In this session, presenters at three different career stages discuss how they came together to form a "personal writing team" that supports writing goals, productivity, and accountability. We share our roles on the team to provide encouragement and wisdom during the process of writing and keeping focus. We also utilize technology to check-in and to document progress. Though our team was a pilot over four months, which started at the end of the TAA 2017 Conference, the format has allowed us to continue to work and support each other over the year. The format, structure, and technological tools have extended to other team writing groups with students and scholars. Unique to this group is the support that Women of Color can provide and the need for increased mentorship for early career scholars.

Presenter: Felicia Moore Mensah is the Associate Dean and faculty member in the Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology, Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research addresses diversity and equity in science education. She serves as the academic advisor and mentors students and faculty across the college and other institutions. Felicia has sponsored more than 30 doctoral student dissertations and has served on more than 90 dissertation committees, including international. Through Sisters of the Academy Institute (SOTA), she has been a member of TAA for seven years.

Presenter: Dakota King-White has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, a Master of Arts in Counseling, and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Counselor Education and Supervision. She is a Professional Licensed School Counselor and a Professional Counselor. She has done extensive research on the impact of parental incarceration on children and the psychological, emotional, and behavioral effects of incarceration. Through her research she has designed a group counseling curriculum for children of incarcerated parents and a mental health model both used in K-12 education.

Presenter: Martinque “Marti” Jones is Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology at Teacher College, Columbia University. Her research focuses on Black racial identity development and identity intersectionality specifically among Black women. Related interests include, examining the mental health concerns and help-seeking behavior among Black college women, as well as the development of culturally-informed interventions targeted at this population.


Discover How to Deliver What Editors and Publishers Need: Demystifying the Publishing Process

Reaching the finish line of publication is difficult when you are not sure of the targets, finish line or the many intermediary hurdles and challenges along the way. This interactive and dynamic session demystifies and explains what journal editors and book publishers expect and need in order to move your work forward to publication. Having published 30+ books, Kathleen is a professor, author, and editor, member of TAA's Council of Fellow and motivating speaker. She has helped many faculty and students successfully navigate the publishing maze. Bring your writing project ideas and potential publishing forum ideas with you for in-session activities.  Join us for this session, which will provide new strategies for your current and future writing projects. 

Presenter: Kathleen P. King is Professor and Program Director of Higher Education & Policy Studies at University of Central Florida, Orlando. Her major areas of research include faculty development, transformative learning, technology innovations, leadership, and diversity. She has been inducted into both TAA’s Council of Fellows and The International Continuing and Adult Education Hall of Fame. An award winning author, Kathy is also a popular keynote and conference speaker.


Hunks, Chunks, & Bites: Plan Writing Projects So You Actually Complete Them!

How many writing projects do you have that are partially completed? Do you feel overwhelmed even thinking about your writing (along with your teaching and service commitments)? Would it help you to have a structure for getting your writing projects planned with an eye toward completion? If you apply what you learn in this practical, strategic, and focused session, you will:  assess and acknowledge your writing project inventory; know what your next steps are toward completion of those projects, have repeatable structures and mindsets to use throughout your writing career; be able to work with collaborators effectively and efficiently when you plan with the hunks, chunks, and bites system. Until your writing is out there, it's not working for you as far as graduation, tenure, contracts, grants, and the like. Attend this content-rich workshop to learn how to conceptualize and complete your writing projects so your writing is out there!

Presenter: Meggin McIntosh, Professor Emerita, University of Nevada, Reno, now known as The PhD of Productivity, is an author, coach, and workshop leader. She works with overwhelmed academics who would prefer to be overjoyed, instead. Meggin has been called an “educational treasure” and has won every teaching award for which she was eligible at the University (locally, state-wide, and regionally). Her 6-word bio is: Put on Earth to teach. Thankful. Learn more at https://meggin.com.   


Moving from Pesky to Productive: Developing a Healthy, Sustainable Writing Habit

Ack -- that pesky writing habit!  When have you heard a writer say that? While writers are generally pro-habit and possess deep knowledge of the writing process, myths about habit formation can be misleading.  Cognitive psychologists, however, possess the keys to habit formation. In this session, we dispel mythology and translate recent psychology findings specifically to writing habits. We present habit formation as a multi-phased feedback loop starting with a trigger, growing from a micro-habit (e.g., writing for 5 minutes), and being reinforced by rewards, including social reinforcement and tracking. Using this framework, participants will analyze each phase of their writing habits.  In small group discussions, participants will then consider what aspects of their writing habits are robust and which areas could use reinforcement. We will conclude with additional resources to extend learning after the session.

Presenter: As a research scientist at the Norwegian National Reading Research Center, (University of Stavanger), Erin McTigue writes academically, as well as provides writing support for graduate students and faculty.  Previously, as an Associate Professor at Texas A&M University, she co-directed the P.O.W.E.R. Writing program, and developed an academic writing course for international graduate students.  Erin has won teaching and mentoring awards, and continually aims to bring a lightness of spirit to the heaviness of academia.

Presenter: Tracey Hodges is an Assistant Professor of Elementary Education and Literacy at the University of Alabama. She is a former English teacher who enjoys writing and studying writing. Her current research interests include developing methods, strategies, and interventions for improving writing instruction in grades K-8 and integrating children’s literature in content area and literacy instruction. In addition to working with K-8 students, Tracy promotes faculty writing development through accountability, a writing habit, and collaboration.

Presenter: Sharon Matthews is a Clinical Assistant Professor of reading and literacy in the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Culture at Texas A&M University. She is a former teacher who seeks to weave children’s literature into content area, literacy, and field-based courses to strengthen undergraduate students’ integration of authentic texts into their practice. Sharon’s research interests include studying teacher educator writing practice and positioning, and developing methods and strategies to improve writing instruction in grades K-8. 


Publish & Flourish:  Become a Prolific Scholar

Increase your productivity by a factor of three. Write prose that is clearer, better organized, and more compelling.  Many scholarly writers are educated at the School of Hard Knocks, but it's not the only school, or even the best. Much is known about how to become a better, more prolific scholar and anybody can. When you complete this session, you will leave with the skills to: triple your productivity by writing daily, even 15-30 minutes/day; create effective outlines after you write; write research that is clearer, better organized and more compelling; and solicit meaningful feedback before formal peer review.

Presenter: Tara Gray serves as an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and the Founding Director of the Teaching Academy at New Mexico State University. She has used the steps in the workshop to publish three books, including Publish & Flourish: Become a Prolific Scholar. Tara has presented workshops to more than 10,000 scholars in 120 institutions, thirty-five states, and Guatemala, Mexico, Canada, Thailand, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. As a workshop presenter, Tara is "spirited, informative and entertaining, she's anything but gray!"


Strategies for Ethical Academic Co-authoring and Collaboration

Publishing has long been an expectation of faculty in higher education. Over the past decade, co-authorship and collaboration in research and writing has increased and greater numbers of co-authors are reflected on publications across a range of academic disciplines. Yet strategies to assist academic authors with how to navigate a smooth, ethical co-authoring experience are rarely discussed and remain a mystery and source of frustration for many authors who engage in collaborative writing. Although some researchers have examined ethical issues in co-author collaboration and contributorship (Bozeman & Youtie, 2016), limited resources are available to assist writers with how to communicate openly, manage power differences, ensure fair contributions among co-authors, and acknowledge credit for shared outcomes. In this session, evidence-based tips on how to positively enhance the co-authoring experience will be shared.

Presenter: Rebecca M. Bustamante is a Professor of Educational Leadership at Sam Houston State University in Texas where she teaches graduate courses in organizational theory, leadership, societal factors, and research methods. Her research is focused on culturally and racially responsive organizational and leadership development. Rebecca enjoys collaborating with other authors because it leads to a more engaging and less isolating writing process.  


Tailoring Time for Writing: Creating Opportunities in Your Hectic Academic Life

Thirty minutes a day is the mantra to build a successful writing practice. Yet, each institution has its challenges like a heavy teaching load or vague institutional expectations or lack of writing support. Four faculty from three different institutions will share their creative secrets that downplay the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities to have a sustainable and successful writing practice. Participants will be invited to share their own unique ways of tailoring time for writing given their institutional constraints. Following the session, we will email all the list of quick tips.

Presenter: Dannelle D. Stevens, Professor Emerita at Portland State University, Oregon, received her doctorate in educational psychology from Michigan State University. She is the co-author of four books. For the last five years she has been the Portland State Faculty-in-Residence for Academic Writing where she initiated the highly successful Jumpstart Faculty Writing Program. Her fifth book, Write more, publish more, stress less! Five key principles for creative and scholarly writing is forthcoming in 2018.

Presenter: Micki M. Caskey is a Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Portland State University. She serves as co-editor of The Handbook of Research in Middle Level Education and The Handbook of Resources in Middle Level Education series. She is former editor of RMLE Online. Micki is author or coauthor of more than 75 publications (12 books, 20 chapters/encyclopedia entries, 22 peer-reviewed articles, 24 other publications) and over 100 conference presentations (124 peer-reviewed, 50 invited). 

Presenter: Laura Jacobi is an Assistant Professor at Minnesota State University, Mankato in the Department of Communication Studies.  Previously, Laura taught at the University of Minnesota and the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her research pursuits include instructional communication and spiritual communication. Recently, she has published a book chapter on forensics pedagogy and several scholarly journal articles in the Qualitative Report, Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, and i.e. inquiry in education.

Presenter: Claudia Sanchez is a Professor of English as a Second Language (ESL) and bilingual education at Texas Woman’s University.  The areas that permeate her work as an academic author, curriculum developer, and grant writer are ESL teaching methodologies, family involvement, and Spanish language literacy as a precursor to bilingualism and bi-literacy.  As a university instructor, she enjoys partnering with local public schools and promoting collaboration between teacher candidates and K-5 teachers of record.  


The Journal Article Writing MATE: A tool for beginners

In this session, participants will learn how to use (or teach their students how to use) a simple tool for writing academic research reports: the Journal Article Writing MATE (where MATE stands for Most Awesome Tool Ever! A label coined by its first users). The MATE combines the techniques of copying and deliberate practice (using a model, slowing down, paying attention, obtaining feedback) to facilitate composing a journal article for publication. The MATE tool is especially useful for academics who are inexperienced in writing research reports for publication, as it teaches how to follow adequate models. The tool is structured for articles using the IMRAD format (Introduction, Methods, Results and Discussion), but can be adapted to fit other formats/structures, as well. Participants will receive a copy of the MATE at the presentation.

Presenter: Patricia Goodson is Presidential Professor of Health Education in the Department of Health & Kinesiology at Texas A&M University. At TAMU, in 2007, she created and implemented a writing support service for graduate students, titled P.O.W.E.R (an acronym for Promoting Outstanding Writing for Excellence in Research). She has authored two academic books, including: Becoming an Academic Writer: 50 Exercises for Paced, Productive, and Powerful Writing, published by SAGE and now in its 2nd edition.  

Presenter: Katherine L. Wright is an Assistant Professor in Literacy, Language, and Culture in the College of Education at Boise State University and Director of the Boise State University Literacy Lab. She earned her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Texas A&M University. Prior to entering academia, she was a middle-school English and Social Studies teacher. Her classroom experiences motivate her research to develop strategies for engaging and supporting middle- and high-school readers and writers.


Textbook Track


Anatomy of a Textbook Contract

This is a workshop session in which we will walk through a standard textbook publishing contract clause by clause to dissect and explain what the language means, what is significant, what to look for, what is worth trying to change and what is not. We will discuss different ways that ideas or elements in a contract can be phrased, and how and why these variations matter (or don't). This session is intended for both established authors trying to interpret their contracts as well as more junior authors contemplating or hoping to get their first contract. Authors are encouraged to bring along specific clauses or questions from their own contracts, though we will not have time to walk through each person's contract individually.

Presenter: Brenda Ulrich is an intellectual property attorney who focuses on publishing, higher education, copyright and trademark law. Brenda represents authors negotiating and interpreting publishing agreements, agency agreements, and joint author agreements.  She also advises colleges and universities on the development and implementation of intellectual property policies, navigating copyright questions related to teaching and scholarship, as well as managing and defending college and university trademark portfolios.  She is a partner in the law firm of Rubin & Ulrich, LLC, which specializes in publishing, copyright, trademark, and higher education law.


Beyond e-Books: Writing and Designing for Mobile Users

How do authors write and design for mobile users? How do we change the ways we think about content when the medium is mobile? Panelists will describe our experiences working together to create a mobile publication. Author Michael Greer and product designer Max Riggsbee have been collaborating on a product designed specifically for students to use on their mobile phones. This product was published in August 2017, and Michael used it as a required text in a course taught in the 2017 fall term. Students not only read the text on their phones, they contribute to the project as co-creators, writing and posting their own case studies. Our panel will reflect on what we have learned about authoring and designing for this exciting new medium, and we'll share some insights and lessons to help other authors make the leap into mobile.

Presenter: Michael Greer is an educator and editor who has been working in higher education for over 20 years. He has conducted a number of usability studies on college textbooks, published on textbook design and usability, and studied the ways in which students read and use textbooks. Michael teaches online courses in editing and publishing at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and is editor for the journal Research in Online Literacy Education.

Presenter: Maxwell Riggsbee is Chief Product Officer (CPO) at Gadget Software. Max has served as an executive and consultant in the entertainment, financial services and information technology industries. As co-founder and CPO, Max leads a team of technology professionals focused on developing a Virtual Publishing platform that atomizes, optimizes and streams referenceable content to mobile devices in real-time. 

Presenter: Christopher Kenneally of the non-profit Copyright Clearance Center is host of "Beyond the Book", a weekly podcast series (www.beyondthebook.com) on the information industry that helps knowledge professionals realize the full potential of their works, while encouraging respect for intellectual property and the principles of copyright. Prior to joining CCC in 2001, Kenneally was an independent journalist, contributing regularly to the Boston Globe and New York Times, among many other publications. He also reported for WBUR-FM (Boston); National Public Radio; and WGBH-TV (Boston), and is author of The Massachusetts Legacy and Massachusetts 101


Emerging Publishing Practices and You, the Author

Educational publishing is in a period of rapid evolution, driven by technology, consumer attitudes, and emerging pedagogies. Not only are the products produced by publishers changing; so are publishing practices. Production schedules, contracts, workflows, and editorial roles are just a few publishing facets that are refracting change in educational publishing. How are emerging publishing practices likely to affect authors and the work they produce? Members of TAA's Publishing Practices Committee are hosting a panel discussion about emerging publishing practices, followed by an interactive session in which TAA members are encouraged to share the narrative and help the committee establish an action plan for the coming year.

Presenter: June Jamrich Parsons chairs TAA's Publishing Practices Committee, with membership that includes Robert Christopherson, Shewanee Howard-Baptiste, Marlys Mayfield, Karen Morris, Michael Spinella, Sharon Van Sell, and Sasha Vodnik. The committee is dedicated to tracking emerging publishing practices that affect textbook and academic authors.


Royalties:  Past, Present and Future

Royalty auditor Juli Saitz and veteran publishing insider Sean Wakely will talk about how royalty rates are determined by publishers and how they are applied to sales in practice. The presentation will address the different rates applied to various disciplines and types of sales. In addition, Juli and Sean will discuss royalties in the digital age, rental books, packaged content and the differences between prices found in the marketplace versus prices on which royalties are calculated.

Presenter: Juli Saitz, CPA, is a Senior Managing Director at Ankura Consulting Group. She leads the contract and royalty compliance practice at Ankura and has extensive experience serving clients including several textbook authors as well as multi-national corporation licensors. Her work in this area includes developing and implementing royalty compliance programs and performing audits of licensees around the world. Juli has helped authors and corporate clients recover millions of dollars in asserting their audit rights related to licensed copyrights, trademarks and patents. She is focused on the shift in the publishing industry to electronic content delivery methods and adaptive learning platforms. In addition, Juli has served as a damages expert in matters involving royalty disputes in the publishing industry.

Presenter: Sean Wakely is Vice President of Product and Editorial at FlatWorld. Sean possesses extensive higher education publishing experience gained by working at Cengage Learning, Thomson Learning, Pearson Education, and Houghton Mifflin’s college division. He’s held positions as a sales representative, college acquisitions editor, professional books editor, editorial manager, and, just prior to founding Academic Author Advisers, was a senior executive for Cengage Learning’s global product planning team and National Geographic Learning group. He is also coauthor of Writing and Developing Your College Textbook: A Comprehensive Guide.


Special Features of TAA Award-Winning Textbooks: From the Awardees

Each year TAA honors textbook authors in categories that include excellence, longevity, and promise of their textbooks. Ever wonder what it is about those texts that make them award winners? Join session hosts Al Trujillo and Dave Dillon for a series of mini-presentations from TAA award-winning textbook authors, who will share special features of their texts that contributed to the success of their textbooks. Audience members will have the opportunity to examine unique characteristics of these texts up close as well as ask authors questions about the awarded works.

Presenter: Al Trujillo is a Distinguished Teaching Professor of Earth Sciences and Co-Director of the Oceanography Program at Palomar College near San Diego, California. He is a co-author of two leading college-level oceanography textbooks: Essentials of Oceanography and Introductory Oceanography. The 10th edition of the textbook Essentials of Oceanography was awarded the TAA Texty Award for textbook excellence, and the 12th edition was awarded the TAA McGuffey Award for textbook longevity.

Presenter: Dave Dillon is counseling faculty and a Professor at Grossmont College in San Diego. He is a general counselor and teaches College Success courses. He has authored and curated College Success textbooks and is a TAA Council Member.  He is passionate about student success, textbook quality, access, and design.


The Book Is Just the Beginning: Repurposing Your Content

Once the hard work of authoring a textbook is completed, consider other outlets that may exist for your content. Possibilities include magazine articles, blogging, trade books, a treatise, scripts for TV shows, and more. The presenter/textbook author is also a magazine columnist, a blogger for Cengage Publisher, a trade book writer, and a treatise co-author. Learn how to expand the markets for your work.  

Presenter: Karen Morris is a past president of TAA, and a Distinguished Professor of Business Law.  She writes textbooks in the fields of Hospitality Law, Criminal Law, and Business Law.  Her books have won both a McGuffy and a Texty Award. When not writing she adjudicates cases as an elected town judge. Her latest fun pursuit is performing magic.  


The Ed-Tech Book Report 2018

From textbooks to digital books; from courseware to virtual reality; the face of educational publishing continues to evolve. Join in for an annual update on the educational publishing industry that includes publishers, consumers, technologies, and authors. You'll get a quick overview of the current financial status of our industry and the strategies publishers are rolling out to bolster sales. Publishers are also turning to new technologies to enhance learning. What are these technologies and what kinds of opportunities do they present for authors and content developers? Our customers are instructors and students. How are their opinions evolving? Do they value the work authors produce? This annual update from veteran author June Jamrich Parsons, offers wide-ranging insight and context for strategizing your writing career.

Presenter: June Jamrich Parsons is an author, educator, digital book pioneer, and co-author of the 2012 TAA McGuffey Award-winning textbook New Perspectives on Computer Concepts and was appointed to the TAA Council of Fellows in 2013. She co-developed the first commercially successful multimedia, interactive digital textbook; one that set the bar for platforms now being developed by educational publishers.  Her career includes extensive classroom teaching, product design for eCourseware, textbook authoring for Course Technology and Cengage, Creative Strategist for MediaTechnics Corporation, and content design for Veative Virtual Reality Labs. She holds a doctorate in instructional technology, CCP (Certified Computing Professional) certification, and is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery.


Video Creation for Textbook Authors and Instructors

Videos are increasingly integral to the learning process. As a textbook author, you can increase the value of your book for both students and instructors by creating and publishing videos linked to your content. As an instructor, videos you create to supplement your course can help students review and retain material outside the classroom. In this session, we'll survey free tools for recording and production, as well as popular paid alternatives, and we'll examine the tradeoffs. We'll also walk through the steps to record video and audio, put it together, and publish it online. If you want to explore and use recording tools on your own laptop, be sure to bring it to this session.

Presenter: Sasha Vodnik is the author of several textbooks on computer programming for the web, and teaches programming at General Assembly in San Francisco. Sasha has also written and recorded several video courses as an author for Lynda.com/LinkedIn Learning.

 


What You Need to Know about Rights and Permissions

Your contract provided by your publisher will probably put the burden of securing permission for the use of third party material solely on you. How much of this is negotiable? What are the possible compromises? And regardless of whether you end up doing it or the publisher does it, under what circumstances do you need permission and how do you best go about getting it? Get answers to these questions from and ask your own of, Steve Gillen, a lawyer with more than 40 years of experience in and around the publishing business.

Presenter: Steve Gillen teaches Electronic Media Law at the University of Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music. Steve worked for nearly 20 years in publishing prior to entering private practice in the middle 1990’s. He is presently a partner at Wood, Herron & Evans (a 145-year-old Cincinnati law firm focused on intellectual property) where he concentrates his practice on publishing, media, and copyright matters. Steve is a long-time member of the TAA Council and a regular speaker at TAA conferences. He is also the author of Guide to Textbook Publishing Contracts and coauthor of Writing and Developing Your College Textbook: A Comprehensive Guide


General Track


Getting Started with Social Media 

Engaging in social media can be an effective strategy for authors to share about their work and build relationships with their readers. However, many authors feel overwhelmed by the range of social media platforms available and may not know how to get started. In this session, the facilitator will provide an overview of social media platforms for academics such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, ResearchGate, Academia.edu, and others. Participants will also hear about time-saving tips and tactics for getting up and running on social media platforms and maintaining a presence with minimal time investment.

Presenter: Katie Linder is a writer with a passion for process and peeking behind the scenes at what it takes to be a successful academic. She currently directs the Ecampus Research Unit at Oregon State University and hosts the You've Got This podcast, The Anatomy of a Book podcast, and the Research in Action podcast. Her latest works include The Blended Course Design Workbook (Stylus, 2016) and Managing Your Academic Identity Online (Stylus, 2018).


Independent Publishing: Securing a Return on Your Investment, A Practical Approach to Indie Publishing

Hear how to navigate the maze of independent publishing for a modest investment of time and money from someone who has done it. There is a wealth of information and advice online for those who have a book that they truly want to publish. Maybe the book fills a niche that is not of interest to established publishing houses but would be a blessing for students in your field of expertise. Some money, of course, will be needed but how much? Is it possible to cut the costs without cutting quality of your book? What is the likelihood that the return on investment will be positive? Where can help in editing, interior design and cover design be found for free or for a modest investment? A list of low-cost resources will be provided. The speaker has no financial relationship other than customer with those on the list.

Presenter: Margaret Thompson Reece, physiologist, author, educator and CEO at Reece Biomedical Consulting coaches pre-med and medical students who struggle to navigate medical science. Her independently published books are previewed at www.amazon.com/author/margaretreece. In her past life she was a research scientist at the San Diego Zoo, Senior Scientist and Laboratory Director in academic medicine in New York and Massachusetts and Chief Scientific Officer at Serometrix LLC in New York. Visit her blog at www.MedicalScienceNavigator.com.


Wrangle Your Book Project

This session will explore best practices and software tools for content management geared to TAA writers. How can current technologies for version control, collaboration support, content reuse, collecting notes and references, and organizing content make writing easier and more effective? How do you plan a writing project to take advantage of these technologies? The goal of the session is to help answer these questions. The session will take the form of a workshop.  Guided by the session leaders, participants will share writing experiences that can be addressed by available technologies. Leaders will demonstrate how some example applications might be used in situations that participants have experienced. Finally, the session will discuss how to tailor tools and practices to particular projects.  Participants will consider factors that affect planning a writing project: the type and size of publication, the number of contributors, the editorial process, and the media used for publication.

Presenter: Janet Salmons is an independent scholar through Vision2Lead and co-founded Path to Publishing with Dr. Helen Kara. Janet wrote Learning to Collaborate, Collaborating to Learn (in press), Doing Qualitative Research Online (2016), Qualitative Online Interviews (2015), and edited the Cases in Online Interview Research (2012). Janet blogs for SAGE Methodspace, and is an acquisitions reviewer for the SAGE Research Cases. Janet spent 18 years guiding doctoral students at Capella and Walden Universities.

Presenter Cole Keirsey is a graduate of the University of Colorado, Boulder.  He has over thirty years experience as a technical writer in the fields of aerospace, telecommunications, and data storage. Through his career he has gained experience in content management for large writing projects and programming of custom software for text processing.

 


 

Roundtables


Challenges and Successes of Bringing On a Co-Author

Are you and a colleague thinking of writing a book together? Are you a textbook author and considering working with a second author on your next edition? Or are you contemplating retirement as an author at some point, but want to see your textbook continue to stay current? The successful authoring team of Frank Carrano and Tim Henry invite you to a roundtable discussion about our experiences. These authors have been effective in tackling many of the challenges in the co-authoring process, such as finding the right co-author and allocating each author's responsibilities on the edition. Once the process begins, new difficulties may arise like determining a strategy to use when writing, reviewing each other's work, handling disagreements, and deciding royalty percentages. Each of us will present a short description of our experiences and then answer your questions, offer some advice, and learn from you!

Presenter: Frank M. Carrano is Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at the University of Rhode Island. His interests include data structures, computer science education, and social issues in computing. He is especially interested in the design and delivery of undergraduate computer sciences courses, and has authored several well-known textbooks for undergraduates studying computer science. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Syracuse University.

Presenter: Timothy M. Henry is an Associate Professor and Graduate Director at the New England Institute of Technology. He brings over twenty years’ experience in information technology project management to his writing and teaching. His interests are cybersecurity and secure coding, data structures, operating systems and professional ethics. He has co-authored three textbooks. Timothy received his Ph.D. from the University of Rhode Island and is a certified project management professional (PMP).


Indexes in Digital Publications

Nonfiction publishing, like publishing in general, continues to venture into digital product lines. If your print book is already digital, or is going digital, will users still be able to use the index to locate information quickly and efficiently? What is the current state of the digital revolution in publishing and what does this mean for nonfiction books?  User tools: "search" vs. Amazon X-Ray vs. the index. What makes an index different? What is the current state of digital indexes? What are the production workflows, and how does index creation fit in?  Hyperlinked vs. embedded indexes: what's the difference? Some (potentially embarrassing) questions to ask your publisher about digital indexes, and why there's no excuse for not having an index in your digital book. Nonfiction publishing: mired in the past, or poised for the future? Can digital indexes help move textbook and academic publishing forward?

Presenter: Steve Ingle is president and CEO of WordCo Indexing Services, founded in 1988 and located in Norwich, Connecticut. He has a B.A. in German literature from Yale University, and two master's degrees (German and Russian Area Studies). He has served on the American Society for Indexing's national board. His interests include digital indexing and improving workflow efficiencies. This is his second time presenting at TAA’s annual conference.


Maximizing Writing Productivity: Perspectives from an Author and an Editor

The purpose of this presentation is to share strategies for boosting writing productivity from two different, but connected, perspectives: author and editor. First, an academic author who has journeyed from graduate student to tenured full professor will share strategies for writing productivity and for dealing with editors through the years. The author's advice for boosting writing productivity is directed to novice writers going into the world of academe; second, to early-career academics seeking tenure; and finally, to associate/full professors with tenure who mentor new generations of scholars.

Second, based on her experiences editing journals, books, and dissertations, a seasoned editor will focus on a key piece of advice for maximizing writing productivity: the process of conceptualizing/framing one's writing project from inception to submission. Framing, or conceptualizing, is an iterative process that enables one to develop a project from a holistic focus, seeing the big picture, before and during the writing process. Framing promotes clarity and flow, helping an editor easily find the argument, key points, and internal consistencies in a written piece.

Presenter: JoAnn Danelo Barbour is Professor and Chair of the Doctoral Program in Leadership Studies at Gonzaga University. Co-editor of volumes in the series Building Leadership Bridges (2008, 2010), Barbour was BLB chief editor of Leading in Complex Worlds (2012), and was Associate Editor for The Sage Guide to Educational Leadership and Management (2015). As Chief Editor (three years) of Academic Exchange Quarterly, she created and edited (five years) the section on Teaching Leaders, Teaching Leadership.

Presenter: Claudia Sánchez is a Professor of English as a Second Language (ESL) and bilingual education at Texas Woman’s University.  The areas that permeate her work as an academic author, curriculum developer, and grant writer are ESL teaching methodologies, family involvement, and Spanish language literacy as a precursor to bilingualism and bi-literacy.  As a university instructor, she enjoys partnering with local public schools and promoting collaboration between teacher candidates and K-5 teachers of record. 


Not for the Faint of Heart:  The Art of Truly Understanding Your Royalty Statement

Royalty auditor and former royalties manager at a major higher education publisher, Rich Wessler, will lead this workshop that will dive into actual royalty statements and show authors how to read them.  Not all statements are the same, but most should contain certain basic information. This is meant to be an interactive discussion where authors walk away armed with more tools to read their statements and feel comfortable when their checks come in the mail.

Presenter: Richard Wessler is a Senior Director at Ankura Consulting Group, affiliated with the New York, NY office.  He has over 20 years of experience in the Higher Education publishing market in matters related to author royalty calculations, intellectual property compliance and Accounting/Finance analysis and reporting.


Team creation: How to Mentor Multiple Students in Academic Writing

Today's faculty often feel overwhelmed with managing the many diverse demands of their jobs, including mentoring graduate students with their writing. Although mentorship can pay dividends in terms of writing, research productivity, and morale; mentoring students often requires individualized guidance -- and one-on-one mentorship can be nearly infeasible.  How can faculty streamline their mentorship processes?  We propose harnessing the power of collaboration, by creating writing teams of graduate students and faculty. In this interactive session, three members of a successful team, each bearing unique roles, share their experiences regarding the benefits and challenges of participating in a collaborative space. We will share specific vignettes to illustrate key challenges and these will provide impetus for group discussion focused on solutions. We conclude by sharing ideas for maintaining a virtual, collaborative writing space, as members change institutions.

Presenter: As a research scientist at the Norwegian National Reading Research Center, (University of Stavanger), Erin McTigue writes academically, as well as provides writing support for graduate students and faculty. Previously, as an Associate Professor at Texas A&M University, she co-directed the P.O.W.E.R. Writing program, and developed an academic writing course for international graduate students. Erin has won teaching and mentoring awards, and continually aims to bring a lightness of spirit to the heaviness of academia.

Presenter: Tracey Hodges is an Assistant Professor of Elementary Education and Literacy at the University of Alabama. She is a former English teacher who enjoys writing and studying writing. Her current research interests include developing methods, strategies, and interventions for improving writing instruction in grades K-8 and integrating children’s literature in content area and literacy instruction. In addition to working with K-8 students, Tracy promotes faculty writing development through accountability, a writing habit, and collaboration.

Presenter: Sharon Matthews is a Clinical Assistant Professor of reading and literacy in the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Culture at Texas A&M University. She is a former teacher who seeks to weave children’s literature into content area, literacy, and field-based courses to strengthen undergraduate students’ integration of authentic texts into their practice. Sharon’s research interests include studying teacher educator writing practice and positioning, and developing methods and strategies to improve writing instruction in grades K-8. 


Twenty-One and a Half Ways to Promote a Textbook at No or Low Cost

In 2018, the promotion of a textbook or monograph can rest equally on the author's shoulders as on the publisher's. Marketing and promotion, however, does not have to be expensive. Publishing consultant John Bond presents twenty-one and a half ways authors can promote their textbook, whether newly released or already on the market. Facebook groups postings, conference presentations, academic social media sites, curriculum roundtables, online Q&A sessions, simple videos, listservs, and other ideas will help authors get started on promoting their books. Done in concert with a publisher or on their own, efforts by the author can have the greatest impact on sales because the information is coming from a peer. The session concludes with audience ideas that have been successful for them or unique ones that caught their attention. Authors spend countless hours ensuring the quality of their work. Promoting a book can be as important of a task.

Presenter: John Bond has worked in scholarly publishing for 30 years. He served as chief content officer for a major scholarly publisher. He now heads up Riverwinds Consulting and advises on book and journal related topics with authors and organizations about strategies for creating and disseminating quality content. For more information, see RiverwindsConsulting.com and YouTube.com/John Bond/.


You Got This: Marketing Strategies to Build a Signature Platform

This roundtable discussion will empower academicians with resources to discover their signature brand, provide social media tips and Internet marketing strategies to engage students and build an audience to publish scholarly content inside and outside the classroom. The session goals are to equip educators with resources to develop a marketing mindset. Get branding tools and discover social media secrets to attract followers and build an audience. Gain awareness of Internet marketing techniques to engage students and deliver your message to the masses. Get technology tips to automate, produce creative materials, stay organized and deliver consistent content to build your platform.

Presenter: JoNataye Prather is the Master of Social Work Field Director and Assistant Professor at Tarleton State University. JoNataye is dedicated to helping schools and higher education institutions address non-academic barriers to learning to promote student matriculation, faculty professional development, and organizational growth. She is an author, researcher and provides consultation to promote culture competency skills, a positive workplace environment and Internet marketing solutions to reach learners inside the classroom and beyond. 


Featured GeoPrimer Presentation


TAA, Enchantment, and Santa Fe

Santa Fe is a spectacular place for our 2017 TAA meeting. The state is home to two million people, yet is fifth in size among states. The average elevation in the state is 5,692 ft. (1735 m); Santa Fe exceeds this at 7,199 ft. (2194 m). Santa Fe is the fourth-largest city in the state; the oldest and highest state capital in the U.S., and oldest city in New Mexico.  In this region, the traditions of Native Americans date to the Clovis Culture and Tiwa people. Santa Fe was founded 1610, 96 years before Albuquerque Yoot to Navajo. From the rich history of the Taos region, to White Sands, to the caverns of Carlsbad, to the Roswell myths, to the Trinity Site and the dawning of nuclear weapons, to a rich history of cliff dwellers, pioneers, spectacular backdrop for many movies, and now TAA in Santa Fe a land of diverse enchantment. 

Presenter: Robert W. Christopherson is the author of leading texts, Geosystems, 10/e, Elemental Geosystems, 8/e, among others, from Pearson. He is a Professor Emeritus of Geography, having taught at American River College for three decades, receiving many teaching awards. In 2012, California State University, Chico awarded him their Distinguished Alumni Award. Robert and his wife, Bobbe', direct travels to text research, completing 17 expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic, and elsewhere. This is his 17th GeoPrimer presentation for TAA.


 If you would like to review program content from TAA's past conferences, please click on the images below.

               

 

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